Functional Aesthetics: Gearbox Montréal

With the help of Patriarche, Gearbox unveiled its first studio in Montréal, which draws inspiration from the urban energy and industrial heritage of the City's Old Port neighbourhood.

Photo credit: Mano Photographe

Following a successful partnership on a previous project in Québec City, where they were recipients of the Grand Prix du Design, video game development firm Gearbox Software and design firm Patriarche came together once again to develop a workspace that combined functionality and aesthetics.

The layout of the new Montréal studio, characterized by its rectangular and elongated floor plan, presented a challenge. Patriarche adopted an approach to create various ambiances and used colour contrasts to delineate the spaces. This strategy facilitated team orientation and promoted a fluid circulation.

Gearbox’s studio in Montréal features a variety of s­paces, including 208 open-space workstations, 11 enclosed offices, 12 meeting rooms, and 11 lounge areas. Each area was designed to meet specific needs and foster collaboration, independent focus, and relaxation.

Photo credit: Mano Photographe

Patriarche pushed the boundaries of design to create a unique concept for this project. The fit-out of the Gearbox studio draws inspiration from the urban energy and industrial heritage of Montréal’s Old Port neighbourhood. It incorporates elements of street art, and draws from ’90s pop culture.

Eclectic furniture, such as stools resembling tree trunks and a colossal meeting table with wooden branch legs, adds a touch of nature to the design. Quirky details, such as the yellow curtain, which was playfully nicknamed the “shower,” reclaimed from a welding workshop, aims to add an unexpected layer to the space.

An artistic collaboration with Julien Lebargy also gave rise to the centerpiece of this project: a reproduction of his work “Little Boy Bomb,” which prompts a reflection on our relationship to war. This also aims to create an inspiring environment for the Gearbox team, where innovation and creativity can thrive.

Photo credit: Mano Photographe
the ‘shower’ – Photo credit: Mano Photographe
“Little Boy Bomb” by Julien Lebargy – Photo credit: Mano Photographe
“Little Boy Bomb” by Julien Lebargy – Photo credit: Mano Photographe
Photo credit: Mano Photographe